Tuesday, October 13, 2015

A Child al Confino

Just this morning I finished reading, A Child al Confino written by Eric Lamet. I was surprised at my final reactions. I have read many stories about Jewish people during World War II and the horrors they encountered at the hands of Hitler. This story was different. Not a story that I had ever given any real thought to over the years. This is the true story of a Jewish boy and his mother as they lived through the war in Mussolini's Italy. The ending of the book was very sad to me for some reason. I cried at what I felt the child, Eric, lost of his childhood.

The Overview written at Barnes and Nobel:

Eric Lamet was only seven years old when the Nazis invaded Vienna - and changed his life and the lives of all European Jews forever. Five days after Hitler marches, Eric Lamet and his parents flee for their lives. His father goes back to his native Poland - and never returns. His mother hides out in Italy, on the run from place to place, taking her son deeper and deeper into the mountains to avoid capture.In this remarkable feat of memory and imagination, Lamet recreates the Italy he knew from the perspective of the scared and lonely child he once was. We not only see the hardships and terrors faced by foreign Jews in Fascist Italy, but also the friends Eric makes and his mother's valiant efforts to make a home for him.In a style as original as his story, the author vividly recalls a dark time yet imbues his recollections with humor, humanity, and wit. Very few Holocaust memoirs address the plight of Jews sent into internal exile in Mussolini's Italy. Lamet offers a rare and historically important portrait, one you will not soon forget.


Reading this book showed me another side of the many plights of Jews throughout Europe during this horrific time. The author was just a child with a very strong Jewish mother who would protect him at any cost. I don't think he really ever realized what he was giving up until much later in his life when he began to learn more of the truths of the Jewish people in Hitler's Germany. I felt the memories of this child to be authentic, funny, sad, and told in such a way that my attention was held from the beginning to the end. I wish the identification of many of the Jewish terms, or the Italian words would have been right next to the words on the written page. I read this book on my Nook and having a glossary at the end was not desirable. I think that is why it took me so long to read the book as I had to keep going to Google to try to figure out what he was talking about. However it wasn't so distracting that if I hadn't looked up the words it would have taken away from the story. I give this book three stars. 

17 comments:

  1. I have this but haven't read it yet.

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    1. I think at one time it was a Friday Freebie! I hardly ever down-load those anymore. But I have read some that are good. This was one I liked

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  2. You couldn't highlight the terms and look them up from the page? I know there's a way in the Nook to look up words as you read.

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    1. My Nook Color does do that. But so many of the words were Jewish or Italian and those words weren't in the Nook's dictionary!

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  3. Sounds fascinating! I like that his mom was determined to keep him safe no matter what!

    betyt

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    1. I liked that too! And she gave up her husband to do it! I think you'd like the book!

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  4. Sounds like a good book to read. I read the diary of Ann Frank and loved it but it was sad at the end when she dies. I May just pit this book on my book list to read. Have a great evening.

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    1. The Diary of Anne Frank was one of those I read so many years ago. I think I will read it again in the coming years and see if I still like it!

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  5. This sounds like an interesting story. I've read several other books about Italy during WWII and this seems to bring an unusual perspective.

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    1. It was a unusual perspective from a child!

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  6. What a thorough review. Thank you Paula. It sounds like a very interesting read. I so appreciate those who tell their stories despite their long-held silences. We haven't heard it all about WW2. I am adding this title to my reading list. Poland was not a good place to hide during WW2 . . . or WW1 for that matter.

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    1. Poland is where the father in this book fled too. For some reason they thought breaking up the family would save all of them!! I enjoyed this book

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  7. This wonderful review makes me realize how shallow my tastes in books have become. Once I get back in the swing of reading again, I think it's time to challenge myself.

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    1. It's not my usual genre either. But I am trying to spread my wings a bit!!

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  8. My to read list is getting longer and longer and longer.....

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