Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Wednesday Hodgepodge


I love Wednesday. Don't you? Hump day. Half-way to the weekend. Although, like I have told you before, all my days since I quit my job to stay home with Richard, seem like a weekend. But one of the things I love about Wednesday is getting to participate with Joyce From This Side of the Pond in Wednesday Hodgepodge. Here are this weeks questions/prompts.



 1. When did you last 'swim against the tide'? Explain.

I have been 'swimming against the tide' most of my life. But the last time would have to be when I chose my life partner. He was 18 years older than me and many thought it would never be a good thing. I think (as you all know) that he was the best thing that ever happened to me. I have always felt that I was older than my years. Richard and I were the perfect match for each other. I will always be happy I swam against the tide!


 2. What's the last self-help or self-improvement book you read?


I don't know if you would call this a self-help book or not. It's not really a book that tells one how to grieve, but a book that tells you how one person grieved for her lost soul mate. Pat writes in such a way that I knew exactly what her emotions were. I wrote about this book here just after Richard died last year. I have been re-reading the parts where she was closing in on the one year anniversary. It makes me feel better to know that I am right there where she was at that time. I may still be grieving for him for many, many months to come. And after reading this book I know that is perfectly normal.  



 3"Tolerance is a tremendous virtue, but the immediate neighbors of tolerance are apathy and weakness." (Sir James Goldsmith) 

Agree or disagree? Discuss. With civility please, because I think we have a good thing going in our very diverse (in geography, age, religion, political persuasion, ethnicity, marital status, upbringing, and cooking abilities) neighborhood here on This Side of the Pond.


Tolerance can cover many aspects of our lives. We are asked to be tolerant of gender, race, religion, education, sexual orientation and many other areas that many of us are not comfortable with. I think my grandchildren handle tolerance much better than I do. I could learn much from them. I have been in many situations where I am the one that is not fitting into the 'norm' (whatever that might be.) It doesn't feel good if you are the one that others are being intolerant towards. But it seems there is so much today that causes intolerance. And political correctness has become simply crazy! There are just times when it is okay to be different. We don't have to agree on everything!  ACCEPT our differences but embrace our sameness. Does that make sense? I think equality is recognizing that people are NOT the same. It is what makes us all so special. I just might be one of the crazy ones!!

Steve Jobs: ‘Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes… the ones who see things differently — they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.’.


 4. What is one of your most vivid memories of the kitchen from your childhood?

The most vivid memory of a kitchen from my childhood is probably my grandma's kitchen. She always sat on a kitchen stool. To cook, to wash dishes, to yell at us out the window over her sink. I can see the layout. I can see my grandma on that stool. But that is all my memory will allow. I don't have visual memories of our own kitchen. Is that strange?


 5. How did/do your own children's summers compare with your summers as a child? If you're not a parent, answer as it relates to what you've observed about the current generation of children vs. your own childhood.


When I was a child we spent very little time in the house during the summer. As soon as we were up and the chores were done, we were out the door. And it wasn't always by choice. It was what our mom expected. Kids just didn't stay inside. We lived in a housing complex that had a huge playground. We spent a lot of time there. We played tag, tug of war, softball, jacks, and spent hours crawling all over the playground equipment. We walked all over town. If we went swimming, we had to find the money (by collecting pop bottles) and then we walked to the pool. Mom didn't drive us anywhere. I rarely ever played at someone's house. We just didn't. My mom didn't like us going to others houses and she didn't like kids coming to our house. Now, with the grandchildren who live with me it is very different. They spend hours inside the house. They watch TV and play video games. And read books. And play on their electronic devices (unless they have been taken away). If they go swimming (at $4.00 a person) I drive them as the pool is quite a few miles away. I follow in my mom's footsteps when it comes to them having kids over or going to others houses. They do it. But not real often. Just the way I am. I think we, parents or grandparents, are more protective of our kids. There seem to be so many more dangers in the world our kids live in.


 6. Tell us what body of water you would most like to be on or near today, and why?


I would love to be anywhere in the Caribbean. I love that beauty of the clear, blue waters. And the amazing white sandy beaches. The palm trees blowing in the breezes that are coming in off the ocean. I feel peaceful anytime I am on the beach. The closet one can feel to God.


 7.  Share a favorite song about water, or a favorite song with the word water in it's title, or a favorite song to listen to as you sit beside the water.


Without even having to think about it, Little Surfer Girl, by the Beach Boys is the best beach song EVER!!!!!!!!!





 8. Insert your own random thought here.


I am thinking about my grandson and his last year of high school. I can remember how I felt when I was getting ready to start my senior year. It is a feeling of 'finally reaching adulthood.' A scary feeling of being on your own. And yet that feeling of gathering your wings and flying free of the safety of the nest. He will be doing that soon. And it is only my job to make sure he is ready. That thought has been occupying my mind quite a bit lately. His plan is to enlist in the Marines. I hope that works out for him. I give him 100% of my support. It is all that I can do!

29 comments:

  1. I enjoyed your answers. I think my most kitchen memory is of my grandma's home made chicken and noodles. She'd cook the chicken in her pressure cooker and make home made noodles, rolling them out and cutting them in strips to dry on the table. Oh, how good that all tasted!! Have a blessed week.

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    1. Ah homemade chicken and noodles....now my mouth is watering. Thanks for visiting Melanie!

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  2. I think your grandson's plan to enlist in the Marines is a great one! So many opportunities there (and let's hope there is no war going on that he'll have to go to fight during his time in there). I know you are glad to have swam against the tide with your relationship/marriage with Richard. I'm sure people must have wondered, but it was a great thing for the both of you! Summers sure are different these days with kids compared to our youth. $4.00 for swimming! Isn't that ridiculous? I read ours here was $2.50 and that would be only for a 2-1/2 hour session. I know I bought son a summer pass for the pool in Montana and it was only $25 for 3 months and they could go and spend all day there once the pool opened if they wanted to.

    betty

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    1. I just don't understand why they charge a kid $4 to go swimming for an afternoon. I can't afford to let them go real often. I should have looked into the summer pass, I guess.

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  3. I remember every detail about my grandma's kitchen--the stove, the counters, the cupboards, the sink under the window, the kitchen table under more windows, the clock and the stairs to the back door an the basement.
    It is good to support all growth into adulthood; I applaud every teen who moves forward.

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    1. That is some remembering of detail Joanne. I mainly just remember that stool that my grandma sat on. She wasn't a real loving grandma so that might be why I don't remember much!

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  4. Very thoughtful answers. In some ways you will probably never stop grieving for Richard but hopefully it will become less painful.

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    1. That is probably true Wendy. I don't think the pain is as deep as in the beginning but it still hurts. Thank you for your encouraging words.

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  5. I love Wednesdays too because then I get to read your thoughts on a wide variety of subjects, always thoughtful, always interesting. I wonder if I should get that book. I will check it out.

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    1. This book really helped me to understand that I was not alone in what I was feeling. I had purchased it before Richard died and had read most of it by the time he passed. If you own a Nook by chance I can lend you mine. But it really didn't cost very much!

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  6. It's funny--I have a pool in the complex where I live, and both my parents have pools at their houses. But I never go swimming. I suppose I should just because I can (but I don't want to).

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    1. That is how my son feels. He lives in a complex with a pool and he's just not into swimming. We used to have a big above ground pool but I quit using it while Richard was sick. If I thought they would use it I would buy another one. They really want to go to the pool with their friends though!

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  7. I enjoyed your response to #3 ... particularly that quote from Steve Jobs. I'm surprised at the level of unease I still feel regarding 'hot' topics of late .... so I appreciate learning from others' perspectives. And realizing I'm not alone!

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    1. Myra I am afraid that you and I are sisters. We are much alike. I am usually not uneasy to express what I feel about today's "hot topics". But when there are others that I don't know really, really well I pause and think carefully before I speak. You, my friend, are not alone.

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  8. Interesting questions again and interesting answers. My husband was a good deal older than me . . . nearly 12 years. Not quite the 18 between you and Richard, but it worked for us. And I am like you about having my granddaughter's friends over or having her go to someone else's house. I'm okay with being little/lot (depending if you ask me or Goodnight) over-protective. I'm glad you found a book that you felt was a help to you along your grief journey, especially to gauge where you're at.

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    1. I was a little over-protective with my sons. I am a lot over-protective of my grandkids. I don't apologize to anyone for it. They will find their way in life later on regardless of how much I protect them now. I did! And so will they! We have a lot in common my friend!

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  9. I really enjoyed your answers too. In particular your kitchen memories of your grandmother. What a nice feeling that must bring.

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    1. No, it doesn't bring a nice feeling. My grandma wasn't the nicest person in the world. That is probably why I don't have more of an image of her kitchen than I do. But it is what it is!

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  10. I really enjoyed this post this morning! To me, tolerance, in it's original meaning is a great moral concept. It doesn't force one to agree or support anything. It simply requires them to do no harm. It's the worlds new twisted, sick view of tolerance that upsets me. The new idea that if you don't activity support what you disagree with, or you even speak that you don't agree with it, that you are suddenly intolerant.
    Life & Faith in Caneyhead

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more that the new views on tolerance is upsetting. I don't feel I am an intolerant person in any way. But I have been called that more than once. And it is always by someone with whoms views I don't agree. Makes me pretty upset too!

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  11. That senior year is a special one, and full of memory making moments. I am a big fan of the Caribbean too : )

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    1. Yes, I hope that he will enjoy his senior year!

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  12. I think there is just something about our grandmother's kitchens that make such a great impression on our young minds. I enjoyed reading your answers.

    I hope you can stop by:

    http://collettaskitchensink.blogspot.com/2015/07/hodgepodge-7815.html

    Colletta

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    1. My grandma made a big impact on my young life. And it wasn't a good impact! But it is what it is!

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  13. I remember both my grandma's and my great grandmas kitchens. My grandma is still alive today and her birthday is this month. She lives in tiny apartment now so I can see the kitchen clearly.
    I was much like you as a kid. I never was indoors and had to play outside whether I wanted to or not. I did spend the night at my best friends house and she was at my house all the time. Sometimes its just easier to have pairs. I had few slumber parties for my birthdays too with tons of girls over and they were so fun and the best memories.
    I pray for your grief sweet friend. I'm so glad you had the love of your life though and it proved everyone wrong.

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    1. Thank you Holli! I always like when you visit!

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I love to hear what you might think. Leave me a comment. I guarantee though that I will delete your comment if you are just here to cause trouble. So tread lightly!